CSS

In this chapter we’ll discuss theming with CSS in Codename One.

CSS Changes Don’t Require a Recompile
You can change the CSS values while the simulator is running and the changes will reflect in the simulator within a few seconds

Activating CSS

Codename One applications always use the resource file. The CSS support compiles a file in CSS syntax to a Codename One resource file and adds it to the application. In runtime the CSS no longer exists and the file acts like a regular theme file.

To enable CSS support in Codename One you need to flip a switch in Codename One Settings.

The CSS Option in Codename One Settings
Figure 1. The CSS Option in Codename One Settings Part I
The CSS Option in Codename One Settings
Figure 2. The CSS Option in Codename One Settings Part II

Once enabled your theme.res file will regenerate from a CSS file that resides under the css directory. Changes you make to the CSS file will instantly update the simulator as you save. However, there are some limits to this live update so in some cases a simulator restart would be necessary.

Supported CSS Selectors

Since Codename One stylesheets are meant to be used with Codename One component hierarchies instead of XML/HTML documents, selectors work a little differently.

  1. All selectors (with some specific exceptions discussed below) are interpreted as UIIDs.

  2. Only 4 predefined CSS classes are supported:

    • .pressed — Targets the component when in "Pressed" state.

    • .selected — Targets the component when in "Selected" state.

    • .unselected — Targets the component when in "Unselected" state.

    • .disabled — Targets the component when in "Disabled" state.

      If no class is specified, then the selector targets "all" states of the given component.

The following are a few possible selectors you can include in your stylesheet.

  1. Button — Defines styles for the "Button" UIID.

  2. Button.pressed — Defines styles for the "Button" UIID’s "pressed" state.

  3. Button, TextField, Form — Defines styles for the "Button", "TextField", and "Form" UIIDs.

The following example creates a simple button with a border, and text aligned center. By default the button will have a transparent background, but when it is pressed, it will have a gray background:

Button {
    text-align: center;
    border: 1pt solid gray;
    background-color: transparent;
}

Button.pressed {
    background-color: gray;
}

Inheriting properties using cn1-derive

The following example defines a custom Button style named "MyButton" that inherits all of the styles of Button but changes the background color to blue.

MyButton {
   cn1-derive: Button;
   background-color: blue;
}

Special Selectors

#Device

The #Device selector allows you to define which device resolutions this CSS file should target. Mutli-images generated from this style-sheet will only be include variants for device resolutions in the range (min-resolution, max-resolution) as defined in this section. By default all resolutions are generated.

#Device {
    min-resolution: 120dpi;
    max-resolution: 480dpi;
    resolution: 480dpi;
}

#Constants

The #Constants selector allows you to specify theme constants.

e.g.

#Constants {
    PopupDialogArrowBool: false;
    calTitleDayStyleBool: true;
    calTransitionVertBool: false;
    calendarLeftImage: "calendar-arrow-left.png";
    calendarRightImage: "calendar-arrow-right.png";
    centeredPopupBool: false;
    checkBoxCheckDisFocusImage: "Check-Box_Normal.png";
    checkBoxCheckedFocusImage: "Check-Box_Press.png";
    checkBoxCheckedImage: "Check-Box_Press.png";
    checkBoxOppositeSideBool: true;
    checkBoxUncheckedFocusImage: "Check-Box_Normal.png";
    checkBoxUncheckedImage: "Check-Box_Normal.png";
    comboImage: "combo.png";
    commandBehavior: "Side";
    dialogTransitionIn: "fade";
    dialogTransitionOut: "fade";
    dlgButtonCommandUIID: "DialogButton";
    dlgCommandGridBool: true;
    dlgInvisibleButtons: #1a1a1a;
    formTransitionIn: "empty";
    formTransitionOut: "slide";
    includeNativeBool: true;
    menuImage: "of_menu.png";
    noTextModeBool: true;
    onOffIOSModeBool: true;
    otherPopupRendererBool: false;
    pureTouchBool: true;
    radioSelectedFocusImage: "Radio_btn_Press.png";
    radioSelectedImage: "Radio_btn_Press.png";
    radioUnselectedFocusImage: "Radio_btn_Normal.png";
    radioUnselectedImage: "Radio_btn_Normal.png";
    sideMenuImage: "menu.png";
    switchMaskImage: "switch-mask-3.png";
    switchOffImage: "switch-off-3.png";
    switchOnImage: "switch-on-3.png";
    tabPlacementInt: 0;
    backIconImage: "Back-icon.png";
    articleSourceIconImage: "Source-icon.png";
    articleDateIconImage: "Date-icon.png";
    articleArrowRightImage: "Arrow-right.png";
    articleShareIconImage: "Share-icon.png";
    articleBookmarkIconImage: "Bookmark-icon.png";
    articleTextIconImage: "Text-icon.png";
    articleCommentsIconImage: "Comments-icon.png";
    newsIconImage: "News-icon.png";
    channelsIconImage: "Channels-icon.png";
    bookmarksIconImage: "Bookmarks-icon.png";
    overviewIconImage: "Overview-icon.png";
    calendarIconImage: "Calendar-icon.png";
    timelineIconImage: "Timeline-icon.png";
    profileIconImage: "Profile-icon.png";
    widgetsIconImage: "Widgets-icon.png";
    settingsIconImage: "Settings-icon.png";
    SubmitIconImage: "Submit-icon.png";
    SubmitIconDarkImage: "SubmitButtonLight-icon.png";

}

In the above example, the constants referring to an image name as a string requires that the image exists in one of the following locations:

  • res/<cssfilename>/<imageName>

  • ../res/<cssfilename>/<imageName>

  • ../../res/<cssfilename>/<imageName>

or that it has been defined as a background image in some selector in this CSS file.

Default

The Default selector is special in that it will set properties on the theme’s "default" element. The default element is a special UIID in Codename One from which all other UIIDs in the same theme are derived. This is a good place to set things like default fonts or background-colors.

Standard CSS Properties

  • padding (and variants)

  • margin (and variants)

  • border (and variants)

  • border-radius

  • background (Usage below)

  • background-color

  • background-repeat

  • background-image

  • font(Usage on Fonts wiki page)

  • font-family (Usage on Fonts wiki page)

  • font-style (Usage on Fonts wiki page)

  • font-size (Usage on Fonts wiki page)

  • @font-face (Usage on Fonts wiki page)

  • color

  • text-align

  • text-decoration(Usage below)

  • opacity

  • box-shadow

  • width (only used for generating background-images and borders)

  • height (only used for generating background-images and borders)

Custom Properties

  • cn1-source-dpi — Used to specify source DPI for multi-image generation of background images. Accepted values: 0 (Not multi-image), 120 (Low res), 160 (Medium Res), 320 (Very High Res), 480 (HD), Higher than 480 (2HD)

  • cn1-background-type — Used to explicitly specify the background-type that should be used for the class.

  • cn1-9patch — Used to explicitly specify the slices used when generating 9-piece borders.

  • cn1-derive — Used to specify that this UIID should derive from an existing UIID.

CSS Properties

This section isn’t as comprehensive as it should be due to the breadth of CSS.

text-decoration

underline

Underlines text. E.g. text-decoration: underline;

overline

Overlines text. E.g. text-decoration: overline;

line-through

Strikes through text. E.g. text-decoration: line-through;

none

No text decoration. E.g. text-decoration: none;

cn1-3d

3D text. E.g. text-decoraton: cn1-3d; cn1-3d screenshot

cn1-3d-lowered

3D lowered text. E.g. text-decoration: cn1-3d-lowered; cn1-3d-lowered screenshot

cn1-3d-shadow-north

3D text with north shadow. E.g. text-decoration: cn1-3d-shadow-north; cn1-3d-shadow-north screenshot

For other CSS font settings see the Fonts section

border

This library supports the border property and most of its variants (e.g. border-width, border-style, and border-color. It will try to use native Codename One styles for generating borders if possible. If the border definition is too complex, it will fall-back to generating a 9-piece image border at compile-time. This has the effect of making the resulting resource file larger, but will produce good runtime performance, and a look that is faithful to the provided CSS.

The algorithm used to determine whether to use a native border or to generate a 9-piece image, is complex, but the following guidelines may help you if you wish to design borders that can be rendered natively in CN1:

  • Non-pixel units border-width. (Except with the cn1-round-border and cn1-pill-border styles)

  • Using the border-radius directive.

  • Using box-shadow (Except when using cn1-round-border or cn1-pill-border styles)

  • Using a background gradient in combination with a border or any kind

  • Using a different border-width, border-style, or border-color for different sides of the border

  • Using a filter

You can open the resulting theme file in the designer and inspect it to see if an image was generated

Generating the image triggers slower CSS compilation and a larger binary so we generally recommend tuning the CSS so it avoids this fallback.

Round Borders

Rounded borders can be achieved in a few different ways. The easiest methods are:

  • The cn1-round-border style. This will render a circular round border in the background natively. I.e. this doesn’t require generation of an image border

  • The cn1-pill-border style. This will render a pill-shaped border in the background natively. This also doesn’t require generation of an image border

  • The border-radius property. This will round the corners of the border. If the style can be achieved using the RoundRectBorder in CodenameOne, then it will use that border. If not, this will cause the style to be generated as an image border

Examples using cn1-round-border

RoundBorder {
    border: 1px #3399ff  cn1-round-border;
    text-align:center;
    margin:2mm;
    padding:3mm;
}

RoundBorderFilled {
    background: cn1-round-border;
    background-color: #ccc;
    text-align:center;
    margin:2mm;
    padding:3mm;
}

Examples using cn1-pill-border

PillBorder {
    border: 1pt #3399ff cn1-pill-border;
    text-align:center;
}

PillBorderFilled {
    background: cn1-pill-border;
    background-color: #3399ff;
    color:white;
    text-align:center;
}

Examples using border-radius

RoundRectLabel {
    background-color: red;
    border-radius: 2mm;

}

cn1-pill-border and cn1-round-border don’t support the standard CSS box-shadow property. This is because the box-shadow property parameters don’t map nicely onto the shadow parameters for the Codename One RoundBorder class. To get shadows on the cn1-pill-border, you should use one or more of the following CSS properties:

  • cn1-box-shadow-spread — Accepts values in any scalar unit (e.g. px, mm, cm, etc…​). This maps directly to the border’s shadowSpread property.

  • cn1-box-shadow-h — Accepts values in real values or integers (not a scalar unit). This maps directly to the border’s shadowX property.

  • cn1-box-shadow-v — Accepts values in real values or integers (not a scalar unit). This maps directly to the border’s shadowY property.

  • cn1-box-shadow-blur — Scalar value. Maps to the border’s shadowBlur property.

  • cn1-box-shadow-color — The shadow color

Currently using the regular CSS box-shadow in conjunction with border-radius will cause a 9-piece border to be generated rather than mapping to the RoundRectBorder. If, however, you use the cn1-box-* properties for the shadow instead, it will use the RoundRectBorder — assuming that no other styles are specified that trigger an image border to be generated.

background

The background property supports most standard CSS values for setting the background color, or background image.

9-piece Image borders always take precedence over background settings in Codename One. If your background directive seems to have no effect, it is likely because the theme has specified a 9-piece image border for the UIID. You can disable the image border using a directive like border: none
Background Images

See Images

Gradients

Both the linear-gradient and radial-gradient CSS functions are fully supported by this library. If Codename One is capable of rendering the gradient natively then the theme resource file generated will only include encoded parameters for the gradients. If the gradient is not supported by Codename One, then the module will fall back to an image background which it generates at compile-time. It is generally preferable to try to stick to gradients that Codename One supports natively. This will result in a smaller theme resource file since it doesn’t need to generate any images for the gradient.

Natively Supported linear-gradient Syntax

In order for a linear gradient to be natively supported by Codename One, the following properties must be met:

  1. The gradient function has exactly two color stops, and these colors have the same opacity.

  2. The gradient is either perfectly horizontal or perfectly vertical. (e.g Direction can be 0deg, 90deg, 180deg, or 270deg.

Examples

MyContainer {
   background: linear-gradient(0deg, #ccc, #666);
}
Native linear gradient 0 degrees
Figure 3. Native linear gradient 0 degrees
MyContainer {
    background: linear-gradient(to top, #ccc, #666);
}
Native linear gradient to top
Figure 4. Native linear gradient to top
MyContainer {
    background: linear-gradient(90deg, #ccc, #666);
}
Native linear gradient 90deg
Figure 5. Native linear gradient 90deg
MyContainer {
    background: linear-gradient(to left, #ccc, #666);
}
Native linear gradient to left
Figure 6. Native linear gradient to left

Unsupported linear-gradient syntax

The following are some examples of linear gradients that aren’t supported natively by Codename One, and will result in a background image to be generated at compile-time:

MyComponent {
    background: linear-gradient(45deg, #eaeaea, #666666);
}
45deg gradient rendered at compile-time - uses background image
Figure 7. 45deg gradient rendered at compile-time — uses background image

The above example is not supported natively because the gradient direction is 45 degrees. Codename One only supports 0, 90, 180, and 270 degrees natively. Therefore this would result in a background image being generated at compile-time with the appropriate gradient.

MyComponent {
    background: linear-gradient(90deg, rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.6), blue);
}
Linear gradient with different alpha
Figure 8. Linear gradient with different alpha

The above linear-gradient is not supported natively because the stop colors have different transparencies. The first color has an opacity of 0.5, and the second as an opacity of 1.0 (implicitly). Therefore, this would result in the gradient being generated as an image at compile-time.

Natively Supported radial-gradient Syntax

The following syntax is supported natively for radial gradients. Other syntaxes are also supported by the CSS library, but they will use compile-time image generation for the gradients rather than generating them at runtime.

background: radial-gradient(circle [closest-side] [at <position>], <color stop>, <color stop>)
  • <position> — The position using either offset keywords or percentages.

  • <color stop> — Either a color alone, or a color followed by a percentage. 0% indicates that color begins at center of the circle. 100% indicates that the color begins at the closest edge of the bounding box. Higher/lower values (>0%) will shift the color further or closer to circle’s center. If the first color stop is set to a non-zero value, the gradient cannot be rendered natively by Codename One, and an image of the gradient will instead be generated at compile-time.

More complex gradients are supported by this library, but they will be generated at compile-time. For more information about the radial-gradient CSS function see its MDN Wiki page.

Examples

MyContainer {
    background: radial-gradient(circle, gray, white);
}
Radial gradient 0 to 100
Figure 9. Radial gradient 0 to 100
MyContainer {
    background: radial-gradient(circle, gray, white 200%);
}
Radial gradient 0 to 200
Figure 10. Radial gradient 0 to 200
MyContainer {
    background: radial-gradient(circle at left, gray, white);
}
Radial gradient at left
Figure 11. Radial gradient at left
MyContainer {
    background: radial-gradient(circle at right, gray, white);
}
Radial gradient at right
Figure 12. Radial gradient at right

cn1-background-type

It also supports some special Codename One values, which are identifiers with a "cn1-" prefix. The following special values are available. They map to the standard Codename One values we discussed in the theming chapter:

  • cn1-image-scaled

  • cn1-image-scaled-fill

  • cn1-image-scaled-fit

  • cn1-image-tile-both

  • cn1-image-tile-valign-left

  • cn1-image-tile-valign-center

  • cn1-image-tile-valign-right

  • cn1-image-tile-halign-top

  • cn1-image-tile-halign-center

  • cn1-image-tile-halign-bottom

  • cn1-image-align-bottom

  • cn1-image-align-left

  • cn1-image-align-right

  • cn1-image-align-center

  • cn1-image-align-top-left

  • cn1-image-align-top-right

  • cn1-image-align-bottom-left

  • cn1-image-align-bottom-right

  • cn1-image-border

  • cn1-none

  • cn1-round-border

  • cn1-pill-border

Images

Images are supported as both "inputs" of the stylesheet, and as outputs to the compiled resource file. "Input" images are usually specified via the background-image property in a selector. "Output" images are always saved as multi-images inside the resource file.

Image DPI and Device Densities

In order to appropriately size the image, the CSS compiler needs to know what the source density of the image is. E.g. if an image is 160x160 pixels with a source density of 160dpi (i.e. medium density - or the same as an iPhone 3G), then the resulting multi-image will be sized at 160x160 for medium density devices and 320x320 on very high density devices (e.g. iPhone 4S Retina) - which will result in the same perceived size to the user of 1x1 inch.

However if the image has a source density of 320dpi, then the resulting multi-image would be 80x80 pixels on medium density devices and 160x160 pixels on very high density devices.

Some images have this density information embedded in the image itself so that the CSS processor will know how to resize the image properly. However, it is usually better to explicitly document your intentions by including the cn1-source-dpi property as follows:

SomeStyle {
    background-image: url(images/my-image.png);
    cn1-source-dpi: 160;
}
cn1-source-dpi values are meant to fall into threshold ranges. Values less than or equal to 120, are interpreted as low density. 121 - 160 are medium density (iPhone 3GS). 161 - 320, very high density (iPhone 4S). 321 - 480 == HD. 481 and higher == 2HD. In general, you should try to use images that are one of these DPIs exactly: 160, 320, or 480, then images will be scaled up or down to the other densities accordingly.

Multi-Images vs Regular Images

By default all images are imported as multi-images. If you want to import an image as a "regular" image, you can simply set cn1-source-dpi to 0. E.g.

SomeStyle {
    background-image: url(images/my-image.png);
    cn1-source-dpi: 0;
}

Multi-Images as Inputs

If you have already generated images in all of the appropriate sizes for all densities, you can provide them in the same file structure used by the Codename One XML resource files: The image path is a directory that contains images named after the density that they are intended to be used for. The possible names include:

  • verylow.png

  • low.png

  • medium.png

  • high.png

  • veryhigh.png

  • 560.png

  • hd.png

  • 2hd.png

  • 4k.png

E.g. Given the CSS directives:

MyStyle {
    background-image: url(images/mymultiimage.png);
}

The files would look like:

css/
 +--- mycssfile.css
 +--- images/
       +--- mymultiimage.png/
             +--- verylow.png
             +--- low.png
             +--- medium.png
              ... etc...
Multi-image inputs are only supported for local URLs. You cannot use remote (e.g. http://) urls with multi-image inputs

Image Constants

Theme constants can be images. The convention is to suffix the constant name with "Image" so that it will be treated as an image. In addition to the standard url() notation for specifying a constant image, you can provide a simple string name of the image, and the CSS processor will try to find an image by that name specified as a background image for one of the styles. If it cannot find one, it will look inside a special directory named "res" (located in the same directory as the CSS stylesheet), inside which it will look for a directory named the same as the stylesheet, inside which it will look for a directory with the specified multi-image. This directory structure is the same as used for Codename One’s XML resources directory.

E.g. In the CSS file "mycssfile.css":

radioSelectedFocusImage: "Radio_btn_Press.png";

Will look for a directory located at res/mycssfile.css/Radio_btn_Press.png/ with the following images:

  • verylow.png

  • low.png

  • medium.png

  • high.png

  • veryhigh.png

  • 560.png

  • hd.png

  • 2hd.png

  • 4k.png

It will then create a multi-image from these images and include them in the resource file.

Image Recipes

Import Multiple Images In Single Selector

It is quite useful to be able to embed images inside the resource file that is generated from the CSS stylesheet so that you can access the images using the Resources.getImage() method in your app and set it as an icon on a button or label. In this case, it is easier to simply create a dummy style that you don’t intend to use and include multiple images in the background-image property like so:

Images {
    background-image: url(images/NowLogo.png),
        url(images/Username-icon.png),
        url(images/Password-icon.png),
        url(images/Name-icon.png),
        url(images/Email-icon.png),
        url(images/SeaIce.png),
        url(images/Back-icon.png),
        url(images/Source-icon.png),
        url(images/Date-icon.png),
        url(images/Arrow-right.png),
        url(images/Share-icon.png),
        url(images/Text-icon.png),
        url(images/Comments-icon.png),
        url(images/RedPlanet.png),
        url(images/News-icon.png),
        url(images/Channels-icon.png),
        url(images/Bookmarks-icon.png),
        url(images/Overview-icon.png),
        url(images/Calendar-icon.png),
        url(images/Timeline-icon.png),
        url(images/Profile-icon.png),
        url(images/Widgets-icon.png),
        url(images/Settings-icon.png),
        url(images/Bookmark-icon.png);
}

Then in Java, I might do something like:

Resources theme = Resources.openLayered("/theme.css.res");

Label bookmark = new Label(theme.getImage("Bookmark-icon.png"));

Loading Images from URLs

You can also load images from remote URLs. E.g.

Images {
    background-image: url(http://solutions.weblite.ca/logo.png);
}

Generating 9-Piece Image Borders

If you intend to use an input image as the basis of a 9-piece image border, you’ll need to specify the "slice" points - where the image should be sliced to produce the 9 images. These are specified with the cn1-9patch directive, which takes 4 pixel values to indicate the top, right, bottom, and left slice offsets.

E.g. Suppose you want the image to be sliced in such a way that the left slices are 10 pixels wide, the top slices are 5 pixels high, the right slices are 8 pixels wide, and the bottom slices are 4 pixels high, you would have:

MyStyle {
    background-image: url(myimage.png);
    cn1-9patch: 5px 8px 4px 10px;
}
The order (top, right, bottom, left) is the same as the standard order for CSS padding, borders, and margins.

Image Backgrounds

Component backgrounds in Codename One are a common source of confusion for newcomers because there are 3 different properties that can be used to define what a component’s background looks like, and they have priorities:

  1. Background Color - You can specify an RGB color to be used as the background for a component.

  2. Background Image - You can specify an image to be used as the background for a component. Codename One includes settings to define how the image is treated, e.g. scale/fill, tile, etc. If a background image is specified, it will override the background color setting - unless the image has transparent regions.

  3. Image Border - You can define a 9-piece image border which will effectively cover the entire background of the component. If an image border is specified, it will override the background image of the component.

A common scenario that I run into is trying to set the background color of a component and see no change when I preview my form because the style had an image background defined - which overrides my background color change.

The potential for confusion is mitigated somewhat, but still exists when using CSS. You can make your intentions explicit by adding the cn1-background-type property to your style. Possible values include:

  • cn1-image-scaled

  • cn1-image-scaled-fill

  • cn1-image-scaled-fit

  • cn1-image-tile-both

  • cn1-image-tile-valign-left

  • cn1-image-tile-valign-center

  • cn1-image-tile-valign-right

  • cn1-image-tile-halign-top

  • cn1-image-tile-halign-center

  • cn1-image-tile-halign-bottom

  • cn1-image-align-bottom

  • cn1-image-align-left

  • cn1-image-align-right

  • cn1-image-align-center

  • cn1-image-align-top-left

  • cn1-image-align-top-right

  • cn1-image-align-bottom-left

  • cn1-image-align-bottom-right

  • cn1-image-border

  • cn1-none

  • none

Example Setting Background Image to Scale Fill
MyContainer {
    background-image: url(myimage.png);
    cn1-background-type: cn1-image-scaled-fill;
}

Image Compression

CN1 resource files support both PNG and JPEG images, but PNG is the default. Multi-images that are generated by the CSS compiler will be PNG if they include alpha transparency, and JPEG otherwise. This is to try to reduce the file size as much as possible while not sacrificing quality.

Fonts

This library supports the font, font-size, font-family, font-style, font-weight, and text-decoration properties, as well at the @font-face CSS "at" rule for including TTF/OTF fonts.

font-family

By default, CN1’s native fonts are used. The appropriate native font is selected for the provided font-weight and font-style properties. You can also explicitly specify the native font you wish to use in the font-family property. E.g.

SideCommand {
    font-family:  "native:MainThin";
}

If you omit the font-family directive altogether, it will use native:MainRegular. The following native fonts are available:

  1. native:MainThin

  2. native:MainLight

  3. native:MainRegular

  4. native:MainBold

  5. native:MainBlack

  6. native:ItalicThin

  7. native:ItalicLight

  8. native:ItalicRegular

  9. native:ItalicBold

  10. native:ItalicBlack

Using TTF Fonts

If you want to use a font other than the built-in fonts, you’ll need to define the font using the @font-face rule. E.g.

@font-face {
    font-family: "Montserrat";
    src: url(res/Montserrat-Regular.ttf);
}

Then you’ll be able to reference the font using the specified font-family in any CSS element. E.g.

MyLabel {
    font-family: "Montserrat";
}

The @font-face directive’s src property will accept both local and remote URLs. E.g.

@font-face {
    font-family: "MyFont";
    src: url(http://example.com/path/to/myfont.ttf);
}

In this case, it will download the myfont.ttf file to the same directory as the CSS file. From then on it will use that locally downloaded version of the font so that it doesn’t have to make a network request for each build.

Fonts are automatically copied to the project’s "src" directory when the CSS file is compiled so that they will be distributed with the app and available at runtime.

Github URLs

Fonts hosted on GitHub are accessible using a special github: protocol to make it easier to reference such fonts. E.g. the following directive includes the "FontAwesome" font directly from Github

@font-face {
    font-family: "FontAwesome";
    src: url(github://FontAwesome/Font-Awesome/blob/master/fonts/fontawesome-webfont.ttf);
}
Apparently FontAwesome has removed its public repositories from Github so this URL no longer works.

font-size

It is best practice to size your fonts using millimetres (mm) (or another "real-world" measurement unit such as inches (in), centimetres (cm). This will allow the font to be sized appropriate for all display densities. If you specify size in pixels (px), it will treat it the same as if you sized it in points (pt), where 1pt == 1/72 inches (one seventy-second of an inch).

If you size your font in percentage units (e.g. 150%) it will set the font size relative to the medium font size of the platform. This is different than the standard behaviour of a web browser, which would size it relative to the parent element’s font size.

You can use system fonts, true type fonts, and native fonts in your CSS stylesheet. True Type fonts need to be defined in a @font-face directive before they can be referenced. True-type fonts and native fonts have the advantage that you can specify their sizes in generic terms (e.g. small, medium, large) and in more specific units such as millimeters (mm) or pixels (px).

text-decoration

See the text-decoration section in the "Supported Properties" page.

Some Sample CSS Directives

@font-face {
    font-family: "Montserrat";
    src: url(res/Montserrat-Regular.ttf);
}

@font-face {
    font-family: "Montserrat-Bold";
    src: url(res/Montserrat-Bold.ttf);
}

@font-face {
    font-family: "FontAwesome";
    src: url(github://FontAwesome/Font-Awesome/blob/master/fonts/fontawesome-webfont.ttf);
}

PlainText0p5mm {
    font-size: 0.5mm;
}

PlainText1mm {
    font-size: 1mm;
}

PlainText2mm {
    font-size: 2mm;
}

PlainText5mm {
    font-size: 5mm;
}

PlainText10mm {
    font-size: 10mm;
}

PlainText50mm {
    font-size: 50mm;
}

PlainTextSmall {
    font-size: small;
}

PlainTextMedium {
    font-size: medium;
}

PlainTextLarge {
    font-size: large;
}

PlainText3pt {
    font-size: 3pt;
}

PlainText6pt {
    font-size: 6pt;
}

PlainText12pt {
    font-size: 12pt;
}

PlainText20pt {
    font-size: 20pt;
}

PlainText36pt {
    font-size: 36pt;
}

BoldText {
    font-weight: bold;
}

BoldText1mm {
    font-weight: bold;
    font-size: 1mm;
}

BoldText2mm {
    font-weight: bold;
    font-size: 2mm;
}

BoldText3mm {
    font-weight: bold;
    font-size: 3mm;
}

BoldText5mm {
    font-weight: bold;
    font-size: 5mm;
}

ItalicText {
    font-style: italic;
}

ItalicText3mm {
    font-style: italic;
    font-size: 3mm;
}

ItalicBoldText {
    font-style: italic;
    font-weight: bold;
}

PlainTextUnderline {
    text-decoration: underline;
}

BoldTextUnderline {
    text-decoration: underline;
    font-weight: bold;
}

ItalicTextUnderline {
    text-decoration: underline;
    font-style: italic;
}

PlainText3d {
    text-decoration: cn1-3d;
    color:white;
    background-color: #3399ff
}

BoldText3d {
    text-decoration: cn1-3d;
    font-weight: bold;
    color:white;
    background-color: #3399ff;
}

ItalicText3d {
    text-decoration: cn1-3d;
    font-style: italic;
    color:white;
    background-color: #3399ff;
}

PlainText3dLowered {
    text-decoration: cn1-3d-lowered;
    color:black;
    background-color: #3399ff;
}

BoldText3dLowered {
    text-decoration: cn1-3d-lowered;
    font-weight: bold;
    color:black;
    background-color: #3399ff;
}

ItalicText3dLowered {
    text-decoration: cn1-3d-lowered;
    font-style: italic;
    color:black;
    background-color: #3399ff;
}

PlainText3dShadow {
    text-decoration: cn1-3d-shadow-north;
    color:white;
    background-color: #3399ff;
}

BoldText3dShadow {
    text-decoration: cn1-3d-shadow-north;
    font-weight: bold;
    color:white;
    background-color: #3399ff;
}

ItalicText3dShadow {
    text-decoration: cn1-3d-shadow-north;
    font-style: italic;
    color:white;
    background-color: #3399ff;
}


MainThin {

    font-size: 200%;
    background: radial-gradient(circle at top left, yellow, blue 100%);
}

MainRegular0001 {
    font-family: "native:MainRegular";
    /*background: cn1-pill-border;
    background-color: red;*/
    color: blue;
    border: 1px cn1-pill-border blue;
    /*box-shadow: 1mm 1mm 0 2mm rgba(0,0,0,1.0);*/
    padding: 2mm;
}

MainRegular0001.pressed {
    font-family: "native:MainRegular";
    background: cn1-pill-border blue;
    /*background-color: red;*/
    color: white;
    border: 1px solid white;
    /*box-shadow: 1mm 1mm 0 2mm rgba(0,0,0,1.0);*/
    padding: 2mm;
}

Heading {
    font-size: 4mm;
    font-family: "Montserrat-Bold";
    color: black;
    padding: 2mm;
    text-align: center;
}

XMLVIewIcon {
    font-family: "FontAwesome";
}